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of avoiding the fiscal cliff. he'll meet with harry reid, mitch mcconnell, john boehner and nancy pelosi at quarter after 10:00 eastern time. mcconnell says republicans won't raise tax rates. the white house says the president won't sign an extension of tax cuts for top earners. chinese officials including the country's vice minister are sounding alarm bells with external risks to growth. they hope the uts will come to an agreement on tax issues or warns the country could face a slide into deep recession. eunice yoom is taking a closer look at the relationship between the two economic super powers and how they're likely to proceed. >> she's sitting down to her regular taste of americana. she and her co-workers dine out at their favorite fast food joint from the west twice a week, exactly the kind of middle income chinese american companies hope will drive their future growth. >> translator: we're used to eating rice, she says. it's convenient and nice to have fast food once in a while and have a change. american companies are hoping gnaw leadership will make it easier to sell to chinese
hubbard, what boehner said, and i take from this collection some optimism in 20 # 13 the way it might play out is whether we go over or don't go over the fiscal cliff, you know, there's a lot to happen in the next three months, that we get to some space where if they did a trillion dollars of cuts and reforms to entitlements, a frl on discretionary, a trillion in new revenue, a trillion in saved interest only because the budget doesn't understand net present value, but that's okay, but if you did that, there's a grand bargain in a way that would be, i think, a pretty good accomplishment for both parties. i think that the principle thing in that is is can you gent a significant chunk of republicans in the house to support anything that has a trillion dollars of revenue in it. >> you think they reach a bargain, move quickly over the cliff. what happens to get to the bargain? >> yeah, sorry, i thought that's what you were asking. >> yeah. >> i'm pessimistic they will be able to sort out that bargain in the next two months so i'm afraid there's -- i think a serious danger, they go over the fis
years later, what moment are we in as boehner enters? >> this is a magic moment, i really do. it is a moment when our generation has a chance to do something about this problem that we created. it is our generation that got us into this mess, and we ought to get ourselves out. we got a good chance. you got a second-term democrat president who has come out and said he is willing to put entitlements on the table. big deal. you've got a speaker, a republican speaker, who really gets at, who really understands the depths of the problems we face, and he has come out and said we are going to put revenues on the table. big move. he got at least half the members of the senate already saying they will support a balanced plan, which makes a lot of sense. we have got the business community lined up firmly against -- for doing something smart, and i guess most importantly, we got this fiscal cliff where if we go over it, we are going to face the most predictable economic crisis in history. fortunately for all of us, it is also the most of voidable. this is the magic moment to get somethi
party voters. you know, mitch mcconnell has to worry about a primary collage in 2014, and boehner has to worry about a leadership challenge from the right so there's certainly a primp on what they can do. that said, the incentives have changed, and you saw chris christie's incentive changed, and there's, you know, the fiscal cliff creates different incentives, and i think the end of -- the end of that one term goal means that different republicans will start to have different incentives which means that on immigration, perhaps on a long term deficit deal, there will be avenues for potential cooperation. whether, you know, whether it takes, you know, more ass kickings or a real statesman to lead the republicans towards a different future, i think that depends on what happens over the next few years. >> i mean, i would add that, you know, there's a real brulalty to sitting in washington, that was just breathtaking to me. as a relative outsider, going into the mill and the buzz saw of the political apparatus in washington, and i think that, you know, it's bipartisan horribleness. it's no
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4